Established nearly 130 years ago, Norman is now the third largest city in Oklahoma and continues to grow. It’s a great place to live, work and raise a family, but two issues challenge our future: 

flooding and poor water quality

 

Investing in critical stormwater projects will fund local infrastructure to preserve our quality of life. Now is the time. If we don’t do anything, our flooding and water pollution will only get worse.

 

 
 

The Norman Stormwater Citizen Committee hosted several open houses in June and July to share information about a new stormwater proposal, answer questions and gather feedback from residents. Additional Open House Sessions are scheduled for August.

 

Improving Our Stormwater System Would:

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Reduce Flooding

Since the historic floods of 2007 and 2015, we've had over $10 million in damage and loss to our public infrastructure. This does not include losses to private property and local businesses.

 
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Protect Clean Water

We get 70% of our drinking water from Lake Thunderbird. Pollutants from stormwater runoff end up in our creeks, streams, the Canadian River and Lake Thunderbird, threatening our drinking water and environment.

 
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PRESERVE OUR Quality of Life

Every time it floods in Norman, residents and businesses incur losses. Increasing water pollution in our waterways jeopardize recreational activities, tourism and revenue generation.


What is Stormwater?

Stormwater is not rain or snow. It is the water that runs off hard surfaces such as roofs, roads, driveways and parking lots. This water is not treated and can collect pollutants (oil, trash, fertilizer, pesticides) that flow directly into Lake Thunderbird, the Canadian River and our local creeks: 10 Mile Flat, Brookhaven, Merkle, Imhoff, Woodcrest, Bishop and Dave Blue.

Eventually, the polluted runoff can cause harm and, in some cases, kill fish and plants. Norman’s stormwater system includes pipes, water channels, culverts, bar ditches, storm drains and even roads and bridges. These systems are vast and community wide.

Learn more about stormwater here 


The Importance of Norman's Stormwater System

“We need to address water quality to have beautiful streams that support wildlife and reduce flooding.”
“We have one main source for water and that’s Lake Thunderbird…Stormwater is important to me because we have one shot at drinking water.”
“The most helpless feeling I’ve ever had was ... when I rolled out of bed and found myself in ankle deep water. There have been two more episodes since.” 

Flooding and Water Quality Issues in Norman

 Flooding: Castlerock Addition, 2015

Flooding: Castlerock Addition, 2015

 Flooding: Bishop Creek South of Main St and Carter Ave, 2015

Flooding: Bishop Creek South of Main St and Carter Ave, 2015

 Flooding: Imhoff Creek at Lahoma St, 2015

Flooding: Imhoff Creek at Lahoma St, 2015

 Water Pollution: Antifreeze flowing down road, 2006

Water Pollution: Antifreeze flowing down road, 2006

 Water Pollution: Soap-like substance in local waterway, 2017

Water Pollution: Soap-like substance in local waterway, 2017

 Water Pollution: Trash in Bishop Creek, 2004

Water Pollution: Trash in Bishop Creek, 2004

 Flooding: Ten Mile Flat Creek at West Tecumseh Road, 2013

Flooding: Ten Mile Flat Creek at West Tecumseh Road, 2013

 Road Washout: Lindsey East at 60th SE, 2011

Road Washout: Lindsey East at 60th SE, 2011

 Flooding: Woodcrest Creek at the Vineyards Addition, 2012

Flooding: Woodcrest Creek at the Vineyards Addition, 2012

 Flooding: Street Flooding at Midway Drive, 2011

Flooding: Street Flooding at Midway Drive, 2011

 Flooding: Woodcrest Creek at the Vineyards Addition, 2012

Flooding: Woodcrest Creek at the Vineyards Addition, 2012

 Flooding: Imhoff Creek at Lions Park, 2012

Flooding: Imhoff Creek at Lions Park, 2012